Healthy Meals

Good Morning Burrito

Typical breakfast options can get a little boring. Shake things up and add a little flavor to your morning grub with the Good Morning Burrito! Make things even more interesting by remixing our recipe with healthy choices of your own!

Ingredients:

  • black beans 1 15-ounce can
  • olive oil 1 Tablespoon
  • whole wheat tortillas 1 package (large)
  • red onion 1 small
  • tomato 1 large
  • chives 2 tablespoons
  • plain, low-fat yogurt 1 6-ounce container

Directions:

1) Cut onion, tomatoes and chives into small pieces. 2) Mix together beans and olive oil. Mash thoroughly with whisk. 3) Add onion, tomatoes and chives to bean mixture. Mix thoroughly. 4) Spread bean mixture on tortillas. 5) Fold tortilla over onto bean mixture cut into slices. Top
with yogurt and chives. 6) Serve with a glass of water. Enjoy!

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Chef Max’s Roasted Chicken & Apple Cranberry Chutney

Chef Max has prepared a festive dish that is perfect for your family and friends this holiday season!

Ingredients

Prep Time: 20 min | Cooking Time: 35 min. + chilling | Yields: 16 Servings

Ingredients

  • 1-1/4 cups sugar
  • 1/2 cup water
  • 1 package (12 ounces) fresh or frozen cranberries
  • 2 large tart apples, peeled and finely chopped
  • 1 medium onion, chopped
  • 1/3 bunch of Cilantro
  • 1/2 cup golden raisins
  • 1/2 cup packed brown sugar
  • 1/4 cup cider vinegar
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1/8 teaspoon ground allspice
  • 1/8 teaspoon pumpkin spice

1/8 teaspoon ground cloves

Directions: In a large saucepan over medium heat, bring sugar and water to a boil. Reduce heat; simmer, uncovered, for 3 minutes. Carefully stir in the cranberries, apples, onion, raisins, brown sugar, vinegar, cinnamon, salt, allspice and cloves. Return to a boil. Reduce heat; simmer, uncovered, for 20-25 minutes or until desired thickness, stirring occasionally. Serve warm or cold. Yields: 4 cups

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Chef Max’s Mini Turkey Burgers

Here’s a tasty #FoodieFriday recipe courtesy of EATWISE Celebrity Ambassador Chef Max! Sink your teeth into these healthy turkey burger sliders for dinner tonight!

Ingredients

  • 1 egg
  • 2 jalapeno peppers, seeded and minced
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • ½ Onion, Minced
  • 1/4 cup low-sodium soy sauce
  • 1/4 cup Worcestershire sauce
  • 2 teaspoons cilantro
  • 1 teaspoon mustard powder
  • 1 teaspoon paprika
  • 1/2 teaspoon chili powder
  • 1/4 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1/4 cup dry bread crumbs
  • 1 1/2 pounds ground turkey
  • 12 mini hamburger buns, split and toasted

Directions
1. Mix the egg, jalapeno peppers, and garlic in a large mixing bowl until the egg is well blended. Add the soy sauce, Worcestershire sauce, cilantro, mustard, paprika, chili powder, salt, bread crumbs, and turkey; mix well and form into 6 patties.
2. Preheat an outdoor grill for medium-high heat, and lightly oil the grate.
3. Cook the turkey burgers on the preheated grill until no longer pink in the center and the juices run clear, about 4 minutes per side. An instant-read thermometer inserted into the center should read at least 165 degrees F (74 degrees C). Serve on the toasted hamburger buns.
Nutritional Information

Calories – 344
Fat – 12.3 g
Cholesterol – 119mg

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FRUGURT

This delicious, healthy dessert can be eaten as a snack anytime! This cool treat will give you both fruit and dairy in one simple snack!
 

    • 1 cup plain low-fat yogurt
    • 1 cup fresh or frozen fruit of choice
    • 4 small paper cups
    • Aluminum foil
    • 4 popsicle sticks

 

Directions:
Mash the low-fat yogurt, fruit and honey together to desired consistency
and pour into cups until ¾ full. Cover the cups with the foil. Make slits in
the foil and insert popsicle sticks. Put into freezer for about 5 hours or until
frozen solid. When ready, peel off paper cup and enjoy!

 

 

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Organic Food vs. Conventional Food

By KENNETH CHANG

 

Why do consumers buy organic foods?

 

A new study by Stanford researchers has added fuel to a debate about the differences between organic and conventionally grown foods. The Stanford report, an analysis of 237 studies of organic produce, meats and dairy foods, concluded that organic foods are no more nutritious than their conventional counterparts. Advocates of organic foods, meanwhile, say that the study takes a narrow view of organic food choices, and that most people choose organic because they want to avoid pesticides, hormones and other chemicals used in conventional farming.

 

Here are answers to some commonly asked questions about the Stanford study and organic foods.

 

Q.   Why would the Stanford team focus on whether there are nutritional differences between organic food and conventionally produced food?

 

A.   Hundreds of scientific studies have looked at just that question for various fruits and vegetables, based on the idea that fewer pesticides and organic growing methods allow for more nutrients in soil, and therefore could raise the nutritional content of organically grown foods.

 

And in some cases, researchers have measured significant differences. A 2010 study by Washington State University scientists found organic strawberries have more vitamin C and antioxidants than conventional strawberries. Organic tomatoes also have more of a type of antioxidant called polyphenols than commercially grown tomatoes, according to a study published in July by scientists at the University of Barcelona.

 

However, other variables, like ripeness, may influence nutritional content even more. A peach or berry that reaches peak ripeness with the use of pesticides could contain considerably more vitamins than a less-ripe organically grown fruit.

 

The Stanford study reviewed decades of research to determine whether choosing organic produce, meats and milk would lead to better nutrition generally. They concluded the answer was no. That is, just following “organic” for everything does not bring obvious, immediate health benefits.

 

Q.   I’ve heard organic milk is a better option than commercial milk products. Is that true?

 

A.   Organic milk has risen in popularity in large part because of concerns over bovine growth hormone, used to stimulate milk production on conventional dairy farms. The hormone occurs naturally in cows, and the Food and Drug Administration has argued that use of the hormone does not change the milk.

 

But producers of organic milk are required to allow their cows to spend a certain amount of time grazing, and that does produce a noticeable effect on the fatty acids in the milk. Compared with conventional milk, organic milk has lower levels of omega-6 fatty acids, which are believed to be unhealthy for the heart in high concentrations, and higher levels of healthful omega-3 fatty acids. The Stanford researchers noted that organic milk does have modestly higher levels of omega-3 fatty acids, based on a few small studies included in the analysis.

 

Organic Valley, a cooperative of organic farmers, says its organic milk shows omega-3 levels that are 79 percent higher than those in conventional milk, as well as much lower levels of omega-6.

 

Q.   What about pesticides? Is there a health benefit to eating foods grown without them?

 

A.   Organic produce has lower levels of pesticide residue than conventional fruits and vegetables. That said, almost all produce, whether it’s organic or conventional, already contains less pesticide residue than the maximum allowed by the Environmental Protection Agency. It then becomes of a question of whether you are comfortable with the E.P.A. standards. Charles Benbrook, who worked as the chief scientist for the Organic Center before moving to Washington State University last month, said the benefits of organic food, in terms of pesticide exposure, would be greatest for pregnant women, for young children and for older people with chronic health problems. He cites research that looked at blood pesticide levels of pregnant women and then followed their children for several years. The studies found that women with the highest pesticide levels during pregnancy gave birth to children who later tested 4 to 7 percent lower on I.Q. tests compared with their elementary school peers.

 

Q.   Aren’t there benefits to organic eating beyond individual gains? What about the health of farm workers and the health of the planet?

 

A.   The answer to this question is not as clear-cut as one would like it to be.

 

For farm workers, some pesticides appear to cause some cancers.

 

Over the past few decades the E.P.A. has banned many of the most toxic pesticides, so presumably the risk to workers is lower now than it was. Many people who buy organic foods say they do so because they are concerned about the health of farm workers.

 

In terms of the environmental effects of organic farming versus conventional farming, it depends on how you view it. One meta-analysis found that organic farming had fewer environmental impacts per acre. However, because of lower yields from organic crops, the environmental effect of organic produce was actually greater per product shipped.

 

In addition, there are growing concerns about the role of agricultural antibiotics leading to new antibiotic-resistant strains of bacteria.

 

What are your reasons for buying organic or conventional food? Do you have more you want to know about the Stanford study or organic eating in general? Join the conversation below, and I’ll be jumping in to answer questions as needed.

 

 

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Fruit Kabobs

Eating fruit before you play sports boosts endurance.  Delicious fruit kabobs for breakfast are a healthy way to get your day started!

 

    • 2 tablespoons natural applesauce
    • ¼ cup low-fat vanilla yogurt
    • 1 teaspoon cinnamon
    • 1 cup fresh fruit chunks (melon, apples, bananas, strawberries, pineapple, grapes)
    • Skewers or toothpicks

Directions:
In a small bowl, stir together applesauce, yogurt and cinnamon.
Place fruit chunks on skewers to form fruit kebabs.
Dip kebab in yogurt mixture and enjoy!

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